Rugs, Rugs, Everywhere! Why So Many Rugs???

Area rugs

Pin It

I don’t like carpet but I do like rugs.  My husband doesn’t like carpet and he also doesn’t like rugs.  So we’ve had to compromise.  No carpet but as many rugs as I can get away with.

Rugs have lots of different purposes.

1.       To contain dirt.  I recently put an old bathroom rug in front of the back door.  I didn’t intend for it to look pretty or to be there forever.  Its sole purpose was to keep the dog from tracking mud, dirt and water through the kitchen.  A couple times I’ve actually made her stop on the rug while I used it to wipe her feet off.  I wasn’t sure it was really doing much good until I shook it out today.  I couldn’t believe all the dirt that was in that rug.  So I guess putting rugs at your doorways really does cut down on the dirt that’s tracked in your house.

throw rug

area rug

area rug

This was hiding in that rug!

2.       Safety.  Some rugs help keep us safer – like bathroom rugs.  If you have a tile floor, it can be a bit slick if it gets wet or if you are wet.  Stepping on a rug as you get out of the shower keeps you from slipping plus it’s more comfortable.

area rug in bathroom

In our bathrooms, the rugs also keep our feet warm during the winter.  That’s really important!

3.       Comfort.  I put a rug in our granddaughter’s room so it’s more comfortable for her to play in there.  No one wants to sit on a wood floor and play. The rug makes a nice play area.

This rug is for playing!

4.       Decoration.  Of course, sometimes a rug is simply to make a room look better.

area rug in living room

5.       GPS.  You’re probably thinking, “What????”  Here’s the deal.  This house has six steps between the master bedroom and the rest of the house.  The bottom step sticks out a little bit and we noticed we kept forgetting it was there.  After tripping multiple times, I put this rug at the bottom of the steps to remind us of where the last step ended.  It actually works really well.  I don’t anticipate having it here forever, but for now, it keeps us from hurting ourselves.

area rug at bottom of stairs

6.       For a specific purpose.  My husband likes to stretch and do a few exercises but there’s not a good spot for that.  So I added a rug in the master bedroom specifically for that purpose.  An added bonus is that the dog never goes upstairs so the rug is dog-smell-free.  He really likes that.

area rug for exercise

When buying rugs, keep these things in mind:

1.       For smaller rugs, as much as possible, stick with rugs that have rubber backs.  They’re safer plus they can be washed.  I use rubber backed rugs at the entry and the bathroom.  If I had a rug in my kitchen, I would have a rubber backed one there, too.

2.       If the rug will be anchored by furniture, you don’t need to worry about slippage.  But if the rug won’t be anchored by furniture and doesn’t have a rubber back, you’ll need something to keep it from slipping.  I’ve seen people use double sided tape but I don’t think that’s good for the floor.  I’ve also seen where people have used silicone caulk on the back of the rug.  I haven’t tried that one yet.  When I needed something for David’s exercise rug, I went the old-fashioned route and bought a non-slip pad.  It was expensive but now the rug doesn’t move.

area rug with anti-slip mat

3.       Consider what the rug will be used for and whether it’s a high traffic area.  Don’t spend big money on a rug for an area where you’ll be eating and drinking.  You’ll be singing the blues the first time somebody spills on your expensive rug.

4.       Consider how easy it will be to clean the rug.  At our last house, we purchased a shag rug for our family room.  It was gorgeous but it was a big pain.  It was hard to vacuum.  Plus, for some reason, our cat liked puking on it and it was nearly impossible to clean up.

5.       And finally, consider whether the rug will be an asset or a hindrance.  Lots of people have rugs under their dining room table.  We don’t.  We never have.  I would love to have one because it would make the room look prettier but we consider it a hindrance.  We eat at our dining room table and having a rug makes it harder to slide the chairs in and out.  It doesn’t help that our chairs are REALLY heavy.  So we’ve opted not to have a rug.

dining room

Do you use area/throw rugs in your house? 


Other home décor/remodeling articles are available here.


 

Comments

  1. I love #4! ha ha Yes, pets will only puke and go to the bathroom on the rugs! Maybe they don’t like the splash back from hardwoods? :D

  2. Dianne in the desert says:

    We use small rugs at all of the entry doors to the house. As you found, they keep a lot of dirt from being tracked throughout the house. Bathrooms should have matts or rugs. If nothing else, they protect the floor from the things that happen in there. Winter time without floor matts in the bathrooms is torture! I have a chair pad over the carpet in the home office/family room to help the chair move more easily and to protect the carpeting.

  3. Josh LaPorte says:

    I’ve always lived in apartments so rugs (room size with pad, preferably) are mandatory to help control noise. Our current dining room has no rug and I hate how every sound echoes in that space.

    I always hated carpet because most of it is cheap and ugly. We have a fairly small bedroom and opted for high quality, low pile, 100% wool carpet and LOVE it! I’m thinking of installing nice carpet in some other rooms. The big bonus is that it draws the eye to the outer edge of the room and makes it feel larger. It also really helps deal with noise. Lots of apartment buildings in New York requite residents to install carpet over a certain percentage of their floors to manage noise.

    • That is certainly true about the noise. Our last house had an upstairs bedroom and it was carpeted. The carpet helped a lot with the noise.

  4. great information here, thank you for sharing!

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge